Oculus Go Information and Questions

What is the Oculus Go?

The Oculus Go is a portable, self-contained “standalone” virtual reality headset and motion controller created by Oculus VR.

How is the Oculus Go different from the Gear VR?

The Gear VR needs to be paired with a flagship Samsung smartphone in order to function. The Oculus Go however has all the necessary hardware (display, SOC, battery etc) built into the headset itself.

But I heard that the Oculus Go still requires a smartphone. Is this true?

The Oculus Go is a self-contained unit however it does require a Bluetooth 4.0 + Wireless 802.11 b/g/n capable smartphone running a recent version of Android or iOS in order to perform the initial setup. See this Oculus support article for further details.

Will my existing Gear VR software library be available on the Oculus Go?

For the most part, yes. The Oculus Go shares a development platform with, and is binary compatible with, the Gear VR. As such most of the content that is available for the Gear VR will also run on the Go. Your Oculus Mobile library will come across to the Go just as it would if you were moving to a new Gear VR phone.

Device-specific bugs aside the only Gear VR titles that wont run on the Go are those that rely on libraries or services that aren’t part of standard Android (such as Google Play Services and/or Google Mobile Services) and some very old apps that were built using a pre-1.0 release of the Oculus Mobile SDK.

The official library of available experiences can be found here: https://www.oculus.com/experiences/go/

If you have a favourite Gear VR app that is not yet available on the Go consider contacting the developer and asking them (nicely) to update it.

Do I need a Facebook account to use the Oculus Go?

No, you can choose to create and use an Oculus account instead. However there are a small number of apps and OS features that are only available to Facebook users, most notably Oculus Venues and the ability to cast your Go experience directly to Facebook.

How is the Oculus Go different from the Oculus Rift?

The Oculus Rift is a “tethered” headset that requires a high-end PC in order to function, and offers sophisticated 6DOF head and controller tracking. The Oculus Go is a standalone headset that is limited to 3DOF* “rotational” head and controller tracking only. So while you will be able to look around, interact with objects using the Go motion controller (and other inputs), and utilize artificial locomotion methods, real-world positional changes can not be translated into the virtual world as they are with the Rift.

 

How much does the absence of 6DOF positional tracking affect the Oculus Go experience?

It will depend on what you’re doing and how clever developers are at working within the limitations. It is still possible to create engaging experiences by utilizing the 3DOF motion tracking capabilities of the Go controller to emulate activities such as holding, aiming and shooting a gun, swinging a golf club, using a flight stick, casting a fishing rod, swinging a table tennis bat, and more. Other common usage scenarios such as watching a 3D movie in a virtual cinema, or viewing 180/360° immersive media, typically don’t benefit much (or at all) from positional tracking anyway. But it does place a limit on the degree to which you can realistically interact with and navigate the virtual environment which tends to impact the gaming experience in particular.

Where can I buy the Oculus Go?

The Oculus Go is available right now from select retailers in the United States, with plans to expand retail presence into more countries in the future. Check here for the most current information.

International customers can purchase the Oculus Go directly from Oculus, or from online marketplaces like Amazon.

Should I get the 32GB version or the 64GB version?

It really depends on your personal usage scenarios.

How much free space does each model actually have?

Oculus are using decimal gigabytes for the total device storage capacity so the 32GB version is actually really the 29.8GB version which has ~22.6GB of “available” storage.

Similarly the 64GB version is really the 59.6GB version with ~52.4GB free.

Can I wear my glasses when using the Go?

Yes. See this support article for details.

Alternatively you can purchase prescription lens inserts for the Go from the following places:

  • FramesDirect
  • WIDMOvr

Features


Can I use a Gamepad with the Oculus Go?

Yes, the Oculus Go supports Bluetooth 3.0 class 2 gamepads. See this support article.

Can I use USB storage devices?

Not currently but support is planned for the future.

Can I use my Bluetooth headphones with the Go?

Not currently though this may change in the future.

Can I stream my Windows desktop to my Oculus Go?

There are a number of solutions but the easiest most accessible method is Virtual Desktop.

Can I stream my macOS desktop to my Oculus Go?

This is possible but it requires a bit of finesse. The best performing publicly available solution is probably Steam Link which will need to be sideloaded and run inside Oculus TV.

Can I stream my Linux desktop to my Oculus Go?

This is possible with Steam Link, as above. It is also possible to utilize other protocols so long as there is an Android client that will run inside Oculus TV.

Can I run SteamVR titles on the Oculus Go?

Not natively but there are some solutions that allow you to view SteamVR content on your Go as a compressed video stream. Two such solutions are ALVR and VRidge (see the Oculus Go and Vridge support article for details).

Please note however that due to some performance limitations that are inherent to these sorts of solutions you should not expect the quality of the experience to be on par with that provided by dedicated PC VR headsets.

Can I use my Oculus Go while laying down?

Yes and no. While this is not possible with most of the titles on the platform it is certainly possible with the main Oculus Home environment itself and most of the media-focused applications.

Netflix: Select the VOID THEATER graphic at the far left of the wooden beam that runs above the TV, then click on the MOVE SCREEN icon. Also has a Travel Mode which dynamically adjusts to match changes in your orientation.

Samsung VR: Double-click the touchpad button (just like you double click a mouse) while facing in your desired direction.

Samsung Internet: Look somewhere outside of the screen area in your desired direction, then click the touchpad button or press the trigger.

Firefox Reality: Assume your desired orientation and hold down the Oculus button on the controller. This does not yet work in any of the 3D or 180/360° modes.

Hulu VR: Select the environment called “THE VOID” then reposition the screen by assuming your desired orientation and clicking the touchpad button or pulling the trigger on the Oculus Go controller.

Pigasus VR Media Player: Select the Void Theater, look somewhere outside of the screen area in your desired direction, then click the touchpad button or press the trigger. Also has a Sticky Screen option that anchors the video to the center of your view regardless of your orientation. For 180/360° clips hold down the trigger for 2 seconds then drag the video to match your desired orientation, or use the options that are available when you pull up the playback controls.

Plex VR: Click and hold the touchpad button on the Go controller while pointing at the screen to drag it around. This works in all three environments. Note however that there is currently no way to reorient when viewing 180/360° clips.

Skybox VR Player: In the “Void”, “Space Station” or “Moon” theater click and hold on the screen to drag it around (or use the orientation sliders in the “Advanced Setting” section). Also has a Lock Screen option that anchors the video to the center of your view regardless of your orientation.

Moon Player: Look somewhere outside of the screen area in your desired direction then click the touchpad button or pull the trigger. Also has a Lock Mode that anchors the video to the center of your view regardless of your orientation.

Virtual Desktop: Assume your desired orientation and hold down the Oculus button on the controller. By default only the Void and Nebula environments respond to this action however it can be made global by enabling the “Allow custom orientation in all environments” option in the Settings panel. Alternatively the Void and Nebula environments have a Reset View option and a Head Lock option accessible via icons immediately above the virtual screen (revealed by pointing with the Go controller). The Head Lock mode dynamically adjusts to match changes in your orientation.

YouTube VR: Look in your desired direction until “Click to re-centre” appears and then click the touchpad or pull the trigger. Alternatively you can simply click and hold the screen to drag it around. This only works on the horizontal axis for 180/360° content.

To reorient the Oculus Home environment, along with the core Oculus apps that directly integrate with it (such as the Oculus BrowserOculus Gallery, and Oculus TV), simply assume your desired position and hold down the Oculus button on the controller. Or alternatively you can choose Settings > Reset View from the main panel, assume your desired orientation, and then pull the trigger or click the touchpad. This also works within the Void Theater environment that is accessible from the Oculus Video and Oculus Gallery apps, though the other virtual theaters (Home, Cinema, Moon) have a fixed orientation. The orientation is also currently fixed when playing 180/360° content.

note: sticky/locked screen modes can induce VR sickness in some people so should be used with care

Is it possible to sideload apps to the Oculus Go?

Yes. You can find a guide here.

Can I run Google Cardboard and/or Daydream apps on the Oculus Go?

The Oculus Go runs the Oculus Mobile runtime environment and therefore it is only properly compatible with VR apps that have been built with the Oculus Mobile SDK.

Media


Is there an official Youtube app for the Oculus Go?

Yes!

https://www.oculus.com/experiences/go/1458129140982015/

Can I watch Youtube TV on the Oculus Go?

Yes, you can watch Youtube TV in the Oculus Browser.

Can I watch Amazon Prime Video on my Oculus Go?

While there is no official app some people have been able to access this service via the Oculus Browser.

Can I watch my digital/Google Play movie collection on the Oculus Go?

Yes. You can access your Purchased content in the official Youtube VR app.

Can I download content for offline viewing in the Netflix VR app?

This feature has not been implemented in the Oculus Mobile version of the Netflix app.

Netflix themselves call the shots here so drop them a line to let them know of your interest.

Can I stream video content to my Oculus Go across a local network?

Yes, there are a number of ways to do this:

Pigasus VR Media Player: Allows you to stream directly from a DLNA-enabled media server. Also supports Windows/Samba shares. See the Pigasus FAQ for further details.

Oculus Gallery: Allows you to stream directly from a DLNA-enabled media server.

Samsung VR: Allows you to stream directly from a DLNA-enabled media server. Additionally supports streaming from http servers using “mvrl” files — see this page for details.

Plex VR: The official Plex Media Server client for the Oculus Mobile platform. Check out the Quick Start Guide. Plex can also function as a DLNA server.

Skybox VR Player: Offers a simple proprietary streaming solution in the form of a Windows/Mac OS client called AirScreen. Also supports DLNA-enabled media servers and Windows/Samba shares.

Moon Player: Offers a simple streaming solution in the form of a Windows/Mac OS Air Play client.

Cmoar VR Cinema: Supports both Windows/Samba shares and DLNA media servers.

Additionally if your media server makes a web interface available through which your hosted content is accessible you can also use the Oculus Browser.

Oculus have provided some guidance on the topic of setting up a media server for use with the Gallery app here, though it will be accessible to other players with DLNA support as well.

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